Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with higher adult IQ and earning ability — ScienceDaily

Longer duration of breastfeeding is linked with increased intelligence in adulthood, longer schooling, and higher adult earnings, a study following a group of almost 3500 newborns for 30 years published in The Lancet Global Health journal has found.

“The effect of breastfeeding on brain development and child intelligence is well established, but whether these effects persist into adulthood is less clear,” explains lead author Dr Bernardo Lessa Horta from the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil.

“Our study provides the first evidence that prolonged breastfeeding not only increases intelligence until at least the age of 30 years but also has an impact both at an individual and societal level by improving educational attainment and earning ability. What is unique about this study is the fact that, in the population we studied, breastfeeding was not more common among highly educated, high-income women, but was evenly distributed by social class. Previous studies from developed countries have been criticized for failing to disentangle the effect of breastfeeding from that of socioeconomic advantage, but our work addresses this issue for the first time.”

via Longer duration of breastfeeding linked with higher adult IQ and earning ability — ScienceDaily.

Breastfed children are less likely to develop ADHD later in life, study suggests

We know that breastfeeding has a positive impact on child development and health — including protection against illness. Now researchers from Tel Aviv University have shown that breastfeeding may also help protect against Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioral disorder in children and adolescents.

via Breastfed children are less likely to develop ADHD later in life, study suggests.

Breastmilk fights infant infections: study

Breastmilk helps fight infections in babies and their mothers, international research has revealed.Scientists say their findings help to explain why babies who are exclusively breastfed have fewer infections than babies who are fed formula.

via Breastmilk fights infant infections: study.

Early formula use helps some mothers breastfeed longer

Recent public health efforts have focused extensively on reducing the amount of formula babies are given in the hospital after birth. But in the first randomized trial of its kind, researchers at UC San Francisco have found that giving small amounts of formula in the first few days of life to infants experiencing high levels of early weight loss actually can increase the length of time their mothers end up breastfeeding.

via Early formula use helps some mothers breastfeed longer.