Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy

Introduction of peanut products into the diets of infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy was safe and led to an 81 percent reduction in the subsequent development of the allergy, a clinical trial has found. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and was conducted by the NIAID-funded Immune Tolerance Network (ITN) External Web Site Policy. The results appear in the current online issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and were presented today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

via Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy.

Overeating learned in infancy, study suggests

Brigham Young University sociology professors Ben Gibbs and Renata Forste found that clinical obesity at 24 months of age strongly traces back to infant feeding.

“There seems to be this cluster of infant feeding patterns that promote childhood obesity,” said Gibbs, lead author of the study that appears in Pediatric Obesity.

Putting babies to bed with a bottle increased the risk of childhood obesity by 36 percent. And introducing solid foods too soon — before four months of age — increased a child’s risk of obesity by 40 percent.

via Overeating learned in infancy, study suggests.

Breastmilk fights infant infections: study

Breastmilk helps fight infections in babies and their mothers, international research has revealed.Scientists say their findings help to explain why babies who are exclusively breastfed have fewer infections than babies who are fed formula.

via Breastmilk fights infant infections: study.

Many parents introduce solids before 4 months

Four in ten new parents start feeding their babies solid foods before their four-month birthday, according to a new study from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“Introducing solid foods early means that the baby gets less breast milk over the course of their infancy, and that decreases the ability to get optimal benefits, like protection against infection,” said Dr. Alice Kuo, from the UCLA Center for Healthier Children, Families and Communities.

Read more at:
Many parents introduce solids before 4 months : CDC: MedlinePlus
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High Carbohydrate Intake in Infancy Programs Lifelong Obesity

Results of an animal study conducted by Mulchand S. Patel, PhD, suggest that human babies may be less prone to obesity if given solid foods later.

Read more at:
High Carbohydrate Intake in Infancy Programs Lifelong Obesity – UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.