Milk could be good for your brain — ScienceDaily

New research conducted at the University of Kansas Medical Center has found a correlation between milk consumption and the levels of a naturally-occurring antioxidant called glutathione in the brain in older, healthy adults.

“We have long thought of milk as being very important for your bones and very important for your muscles,” Sullivan said. “This study suggests that it could be important for your brain as well.”

The researchers found that participants who had indicated they had drunk milk recently had higher levels of glutathione in their brains. This is important, the researchers said, because glutathione could help stave off oxidative stress and the resulting damage caused by reactive chemical compounds produced during the normal metabolic process in the brain. Oxidative stress is known to be associated with a number of different diseases and conditions, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease and many other conditions, said Dr. Choi.

via Milk could be good for your brain — ScienceDaily.

Nutrition Experts Get Paid By Coca-Cola To Call Soda A Healthy Snack : LIFE : Tech Times

Coca-Cola has been paying money to researchers to promote soda as a healthy part of snacking, according to new reports.

During the month of February 2015, several health writers wrote columns on healthy snacking, in honor of American Health Month. These reports, written by trusted authorities, appeared on several media outlets including national sources. Each one of these articles suggested Coca-Cola or other sodas as a drink to help support good eating habits.

These actions suggest that food companies are active in supporting research that will help cast their products in a good light, potentially boosting sales. Although Coca-Cola remains the largest soda manufacturer in the country, the company has seen sales fall significantly in the last few years, as Americans reduced their intake of sugary beverages. The company is not denying that they pay experts to promote their products, comparing the practice to product placement contracts with movie companies.

via Nutrition Experts Get Paid By Coca-Cola To Call Soda A Healthy Snack : LIFE : Tech Times.

Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy

Introduction of peanut products into the diets of infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy was safe and led to an 81 percent reduction in the subsequent development of the allergy, a clinical trial has found. The study was supported by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and was conducted by the NIAID-funded Immune Tolerance Network (ITN) External Web Site Policy. The results appear in the current online issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and were presented today at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology.

via Study finds peanut consumption in infancy prevents peanut allergy.

Drinking milk while pregnant makes kids taller – NZ Herald News

Children born to women who drink milk during pregnancy are more likely to be tall when they are teenagers, new research shows.

The results, published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, show teenagers of both sexes were generally taller if their mothers had drunk more than 150 millilitres a day during the pregnancy, compared to children born to women who drank less than that amount.

via Drinking milk while pregnant makes kids taller – research – Life & Style – NZ Herald News.

Breastfed children are less likely to develop ADHD later in life, study suggests

We know that breastfeeding has a positive impact on child development and health — including protection against illness. Now researchers from Tel Aviv University have shown that breastfeeding may also help protect against Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), the most commonly diagnosed neurobehavioral disorder in children and adolescents.

via Breastfed children are less likely to develop ADHD later in life, study suggests.

Sleep deprivation linked to aging skin, study suggests

In a first-of-its-kind clinical trial, physician-scientists at University Hospitals (UH) Case Medical Center found that sleep quality impacts skin function and aging. The recently completed study, commissioned by Estée Lauder, demonstrated that poor sleepers had increased signs of skin aging and slower recovery from a variety of environmental stressors, such as disruption of the skin barrier or ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Poor sleepers also had worse assessment of their own skin and facial appearance.

via Sleep deprivation linked to aging skin, study suggests.

Exercise reorganizes the brain to be more resilient to stress

Physical activity reorganizes the brain so that its response to stress is reduced and anxiety is less likely to interfere with normal brain function, according to a research team based at Princeton University

via Exercise reorganizes the brain to be more resilient to stress.